GARY WILCOCKSON • ARTIST

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The method I have adopted to produce my work is Stippling which traces its roots back to 16C. Stippling is creating an image by using small dots, the denser the build of dots the darker the shade, pointillism uses the same method only uses multiple colours.  Perhaps subconsciously my inspiration for stippling or dot work came from learning about the printing technique whilst studying Graphic Design at Plymouth Art College, and later at Falmouth College of Arts. To reproduce images on the printing press, screens or plates are made up by half-toning the size and spacing of dots in turn giving us dpi, meaning dots per inch.

I’ve worked in the design and print industry since graduating from Falmouth College of Arts in 1994 and working for many years as an artist painting backdrops for stage and theatre, I currently work as graphic designer in Plymouth.

As with most artists I started drawing from an early age and remember constantly trying to copy a picture of a Kingfisher from my brothers bird spotting book. Throughout my adult life I have always drawn or painted, in 2014 stippling piqued my curiosity as it allowed me to become obsessed with capturing textures more effectively, despite taking hours to produce a tiny section. As my technique and ability grew the amount of dots I produce or the worry about how long a piece took waned as I decided the most important aspect of my work is to produce the best piece I can without the cloud of a deadline hanging over me.

What interest me is trying to make the picture look as if it’s not made up of dots, like you see in a photo on a printed page, with stippling I feel I can capture the structured wildness of a feather or smooth glint in their eye. The process of stippling is long and arduous and requires an awful lot of patience and concentration so fine coffee and good music often helps.

If you are interested, current estimates range from about 80+ hours. I use Copic multiliner pens 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 on 250g fine grain, acid free paper. The source of my current pieces come from my wife’s uncle who took these pictures near his home in north Cornwall.

 

 

All content © by Gary Wilcockson 2019 | hello@garywilcockson.com

GARY WILCOCKSON

ARTIST

Bio

The method I have adopted to produce my work is Stippling which traces its roots back to 16C. Stippling is creating an image by using small dots, the denser the build of dots the darker the shade, pointillism uses the same method only uses multiple colours.  Perhaps subconsciously my inspiration for stippling or dot work came from learning about the printing technique whilst studying Graphic Design at Plymouth Art College, and later at Falmouth College of Arts. To reproduce images on the printing press, screens or plates are made up by half-toning the size and spacing of dots in turn giving us dpi, meaning dots per inch.

I’ve worked in the design and print industry since graduating from Falmouth College of Arts in 1994 and working for many years as an artist painting backdrops for stage and theatre, I currently work as graphic designer in Plymouth.

As with most artists I started drawing from an early age and remember constantly trying to copy a picture of a Kingfisher from my brothers bird spotting book. Throughout my adult life I have always drawn or painted, in 2014 stippling piqued my curiosity as it allowed me to become obsessed with capturing textures more effectively, despite taking hours to produce a tiny section. As my technique and ability grew the amount of dots I produce or the worry about how long a piece took waned as I decided the most important aspect of my work is to produce the best piece I can without the cloud of a deadline hanging over me.

What interest me is trying to make the picture look as if it’s not made up of dots, like you see in a photo on a printed page, with stippling I feel I can capture the structured wildness of a feather or smooth glint in their eye. The process of stippling is long and arduous and requires an awful lot of patience and concentration so fine coffee and good music often helps.

If you are interested, current estimates range from about 80+ hours. I use Copic multiliner pens 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 on 250g fine grain, acid free paper. The source of my current pieces come from my wife’s uncle who took these pictures near his home in north Cornwall.

All content © by Gary Wilcockson 2019 | hello@garywilcockson.com